What happened when … CTG went to a secret screening of The Night Manager

 

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Last week I was super excited to be invited along to a secret screening of BBC One and The Ink Factory’s new drama The Night Manager, and to hang out with some of the cast (including one of my longtime actor heroes – Hugh Laurie!).

Hardly able to contain myself with excitement, I trotted along to the swanky May Fair Hotel to find out all about it.

This adaptation of John le Carré’s wonderful spy thriller The Night Manager (published in 1993) is a fascinating and complex story of criminality. Former British solider, Jonathan Pine, is recruited by intelligence operative, Angela Burr, to infiltrate the inner circle of an arms dealer who is known as ‘the worst man in the world’, Richard Roper, in an attempt to bring him to justice.

Gracefully interpreted for the small screen, The Night Manager remains faithful to le Carré’s original whilst bringing it undeniably into current times. From the opening scenes in Cairo, the story pulled me into the world of The Night Manager and held me enthralled (and sometimes appalled) for the duration of the screening. In the discussion afterwards, Hugh Laurie spoke of his love for le Carré’s novel and his desire to bring the story to the screen after he first read it over twenty years ago. It’s been a long time in the making, but having seen the results I’d say that the wait has been absolutely worth it.

Stunning visually, with stand out performances from Hugh Laurie in the role of Richard Roper, Tom Hiddleston in the role of Jonathan Pine, and Olivia Colman in the role of Angela Burr, this gripping adaptation is a must-watch drama for 2016

The Night Manager will be screened later this month on BBC One in six one-hour episodes.

Be sure to watch live or record it (FYI I’m going to do both!) because you’re really not going to want to miss it!

For a sneaky peep at The Night Manager click here to go to the trailer on YouTube

AudioBook Addict reviews: The Child by Sebastian Fitzek – an abridged dramatisation

Today, AudioBook Addict takes over the controls at CTG HQ to give his verdict on new audible drama The Child by Sebastian Fitzek. Here’s what he has to say …

The Child cover image

The Child cover image

Title: The Child

Author: Sebastian Fitzek

Narrated By: Rupert Penry-Jones, Jack Boulter, Emilia Fox, Stephen Marcus, Robert Glenister, Andy Serkis

Run Time: 6 hrs and 56 minutes

Abridged Dramatisation: released on 07/08/2014

What the blurb says:My name is Simon. I’m 10 years old. I’m a serial killer.

Robert Stern (Rupert Penry-Jones), a successful defense attorney, doesn’t know what lies in store for him when he agrees to meet a new client in a derelict estate on the outskirts of Berlin. Stern is more than surprised, when his old love interest and professional nurse Carina (Emilia Fox) presents him a ten year old boy as his new client. Simon (Jack Boulter), a terminally ill child, who is convinced he has murdered many men in a previous life.”

The review:

So, just to be clear, this is good, very good! But I want to go back a bit and tell you how I got to that conclusion.

I think it was Stephen King in his book ‘On Writing’ that said words to the effect of ‘abridged audio is the pits’ (Stephen, I wholeheartedly agree and if you didn’t say it, I am now). I’d add to that by saying I’d always thought that dramatised, abridged audio would be even worse. I based this only on experiences of listening to recordings with my children, like Blyton’s Malory Towers or The Famous Five – this is not them!

The story itself is excellent – dark, edgy, challenging – everything I like in my crime thrillers. From the time we first meet Simon, you’re compelled to like him and (NO SPOILERS) the relationships that build, grow and break down during that story are crafted masterfully. The action and intrigue are non-stop and at just short of 7 hours – I wanted more.

The recording and scripting are simply excellent with first class narration and, whilst the sound effects in previous recordings have seemed to distract me from the story, here, the sombre music and effects only served to add genuine atmosphere to this excellently creepy book. The young boy, Simon, narrated by Jack Boulter deserves a special mention for his excellent role; I really rooted for him throughout the book. Also, Robert Glenister put in another superb performance equal to that of his work on The Cuckoo’s Calling and The Silkworm.

Recommended

 

[With thanks to Audible UK for a review copy of The Child.]