#MyLittleEye launches in paperback today: see me take @TheAngelaClarke twisted author challenge plus chance to #win a copy of the book!

To celebrate My Little Eye coming out in paperback today I’m sharing this video interview fabulous crime writer and radio presenter Angela Clarke did with me on her YouTube channel.

We talk about My Little Eye, crime fiction, duct tape, handcuffs and she challenges me to a twisted author challenge – to put 80s-style make up on in 60 seconds with my eyes closed! It was a lot of fun to film – hope you enjoy it!

There’s also a chance to win a signed limited edition proof copy of My Little Eye!

Check out the video on YouTube here: 

My Little Eye is out now – find it in Waterstones, Tesco, and all good bookstores and online at Amazon. I really hope you enjoy it!

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WHOOP! DEEP BLUE TROUBLE (LORI ANDERSON BOOK 2) OUT IN EBOOK TODAY!

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I’m so excited!

DEEP BLUE TROUBLE – the second book in the Lori Anderson action thriller series – is published today in eBook.

Following on a few days from where the first book in the series – DEEP DOWN DEAD – ended, DEEP BLUE TROUBLE is the next instalment in the life of kick-ass single mom Florida bounty hunter Lori Anderson. It’s a book about being taken seriously as a woman in a male dominated profession, protecting your child, getting revenge, and seeing just how far someone will go to protect the ones they love…

Here’s the blurb:

How far would you go to protect the ones you love?

Single-mother Florida bounty hunter Lori Anderson’s got an ocean of trouble on her hands. Her daughter Dakota is safe, but her cancer is threatening a comeback and Lori needs JT – Dakota’s daddy and the man who taught Lori everything – alive and kicking.

Problem is, he’s behind bars, and heading for death row.

Desperate to save him, Lori does a deal, taking an off-the-books job from shady FBI agent Alex Monroe. Bring back on-the-run felon, Gibson ‘The Fish’ Fletcher, and JT walks free.

But this is one job she’s got to get right, or she’ll lose everything…

Breathlessly paced. High-voltage action. Edge-of-your-seat jeopardy. DEEP BLUE TROUBLE marks the return of the most memorable and fearless female characters in crime fiction.

You can buy it now from Amazon UK: HERE

You can buy it now from Amazon US: HERE

[If you prefer your books in hard copy, DEEP BLUE TROUBLE will be out in paperback on 15th January 2018 in the UK and in May 2018 in the USA]

THE LAST RESORT – A LORI ANDERSON SHORT STORY – IS OUT NOW! #CrimeFiction

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If you’re looking for a Lori and JT fix before the next book in the Lori Anderson thriller series – DEEP BLUE TROUBLE – comes out later this year don’t fear!

You can download a Lori short story – THE LAST RESORT – that goes back in time to when Lori was training with JT and learning the bounty hunting business.

Here’s what the blurb says:

“Done with a life of exploitation and violence, Lori Anderson is training to be a bounty hunter. Holed up in the Georgia Mountains with her reclusive mentor, JT, Lori is determined to put her new skills into practice. Behind JT’s back, she breaks his rules and grabs the chance she’s looking for. Will her gamble pay off, or will she have to learn the hard way?

The Last Resort is the first in the Rookie Bounty Hunter series of short stories, marking the nail-biting start to a high-octane series of thrillers featuring one of the most unforgettable and fearless female protagonists in crime fiction.”

It also includes a free extract of DEEP DOWN DEAD, book one in the Lori Anderson Series.

I’ve been totally blown away by the fabulous crime fiction bloggers and reviewers who’ve read and shared their thoughts on THE LAST RESORT – here’s what they’re saying:

“Raw, edgy and a real page turner – the short story will satisfy your urges” Noelle @nholten40 – read full review on CrimeBookJunkie here

“What a start to the day! We all need a bit of Lori Anderson’s courage and determination” Christine @northernlass73 – read full review on Northern Crime here

“Broadribb has a tough vulnerability that really draws you in. I think she’s a superstar on the rise” Craig @craigsisterson – read full review on Kiwi Crime blog here

“A punchy, fast paced short story and I absolutely loved it. More please!” Emma @damppebbles – read full review on damppebbles.com here

“Ooh Lawdy, how it all began (think I need a nap). Great prequel to Deep Down Dead.” Sandy @rowingwabbit – read full review on Goodreads here

Fancy a Lori and JT fix?

CLICK HERE to hop on over to Amazon.com to buy and download THE LAST RESORT 

 

**COVER REVEAL** DOUBLE TROUBLE EXCLUSIVE** #TwoOClockBoy by MARK HILL

OMG I am so incredibly excited to be a part of this cover reveal – playing number two in the one-two “double trouble” exclusive reveal along with the Queen of Bloggers LizLovesBooks – and revealing the fabulous cover for my good friend MARK HILL’s debut crime thriller – THE TWO O’CLOCK BOY. 

This is one hell of a read – I can say that because I’ve been allowed a super early preview of this gritty London-set crime thriller – and folks, it’s something really very special.

Here’s the gorgeously fabulous cover – a thing of glass-breakingly, ice-shatteringly loveliness …

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And here’s the blurb:

TWO CHILDHOOD FRIENDS… ONE BECAME A DETECTIVE… ONE BECAME A KILLER…

One night changed their lives
Thirty years ago, the Longacre Children’s Home stood on a London street where once-grand Victorian homes lay derelict. There its children lived in terror of Gordon Tallis, the home’s manager.

Cries in the fire and smoke
Then Connor Laird arrived: a frighteningly intense boy who quickly became Tallis’ favourite criminal helper. Soon after, destruction befell the Longacre, and the facts of that night have lain buried . . . until today.

A truth both must hide
Now, a mysterious figure, the Two O’Clock Boy, is killing all who grew up there, one by one. DI Ray Drake will do whatever it take to stop the murders – but he will go even further to cover up the truth.

THE TWO O’CLOCK BOY is the first in the DI Ray Drake series and, if you like your crime thrillers twisty-turny, high on drama and grit, and packed with gasp out loud moments, this is going to be just your thing.

Trust me, you will not want to miss THE TWO O’CLOCK BOY when it’s published on 17th November 2016!

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What happened when … CTG went to a secret screening of The Night Manager

 

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Last week I was super excited to be invited along to a secret screening of BBC One and The Ink Factory’s new drama The Night Manager, and to hang out with some of the cast (including one of my longtime actor heroes – Hugh Laurie!).

Hardly able to contain myself with excitement, I trotted along to the swanky May Fair Hotel to find out all about it.

This adaptation of John le Carré’s wonderful spy thriller The Night Manager (published in 1993) is a fascinating and complex story of criminality. Former British solider, Jonathan Pine, is recruited by intelligence operative, Angela Burr, to infiltrate the inner circle of an arms dealer who is known as ‘the worst man in the world’, Richard Roper, in an attempt to bring him to justice.

Gracefully interpreted for the small screen, The Night Manager remains faithful to le Carré’s original whilst bringing it undeniably into current times. From the opening scenes in Cairo, the story pulled me into the world of The Night Manager and held me enthralled (and sometimes appalled) for the duration of the screening. In the discussion afterwards, Hugh Laurie spoke of his love for le Carré’s novel and his desire to bring the story to the screen after he first read it over twenty years ago. It’s been a long time in the making, but having seen the results I’d say that the wait has been absolutely worth it.

Stunning visually, with stand out performances from Hugh Laurie in the role of Richard Roper, Tom Hiddleston in the role of Jonathan Pine, and Olivia Colman in the role of Angela Burr, this gripping adaptation is a must-watch drama for 2016

The Night Manager will be screened later this month on BBC One in six one-hour episodes.

Be sure to watch live or record it (FYI I’m going to do both!) because you’re really not going to want to miss it!

For a sneaky peep at The Night Manager click here to go to the trailer on YouTube

The launch party everyone’s talking about: Snowblind by Ragnar Jónasson

 

(L-R) Quentin Bates, Karen Sullivan - Orenda Books, Ragnar Jónasson

(L-R) Quentin Bates, Karen Sullivan – Orenda Books, Ragnar Jónasson

Last night I headed to the fabulous Goldsboro Books to the launch of Ragnar Jónasson’s brilliant crime novel SNOWBLIND.

Ragnar is an established author in Iceland and SNOWBLIND is the first of his Dark Iceland crime series to be published in the UK (by wonderful new publisher Orenda Books).

It was a fabulous evening – I got my hands on one of the gorgeous hardback copies (available exclusively from Goldsboro Books) and there was even an amazing SNOWBLIND-themed cake!

I’ll be reviewing SNOWBLIND as part of Ragnar’s official blog tour on the 22nd May but, in the meantime, here’s the blurb: Siglufjörður: an idyllically quiet fishing village in Northern Iceland, where no one locks their doors – accessible only via a small mountain tunnel. Ari Thór Arason: a rookie policeman on his first posting, far from his girlfriend in Reykjavik – with a past that he’s unable to leave behind. When a young woman is found lying half-naked in the snow, bleeding and unconscious, and a highly esteemed, elderly writer falls to his death in the local theatre, Ari is dragged straight into the heart of a community where he can trust no one, and secrets and lies are a way of life. An avalanche and unremitting snowstorms close the mountain pass, and the 24-hour darkness threatens to push Ari over the edge, as curtains begin to twitch, and his investigation becomes increasingly complex, chilling and personal. Past plays tag with the present and the claustrophobic tension mounts, while Ari is thrust ever deeper into his own darkness – blinded by snow, and with a killer on the loose.”

The cake!!

The cake!!

The original Icelandic novel was translated by UK crime writer Quentin Bates who did a fantastic guest post for the CTG blog last week – you can read all about the translation process here 

To find out more about Snowblind pop over to the Orenda Books website here http://orendabooks.co.uk/ragnar-jonasson/

and be sure to follow @ragnarjo (Ragnar) @OrendaBooks (Orenda Books) and @graskeggur (Quentin) on Twitter for all their up to date news.

Guest Post: Quentin Bates on Stepping into the Translation Zone #Snowblind

Quentin Bates

Quentin Bates

Today, crime writer Quentin Bates takes the reins here at CTG HQ to tell us about his recent experiences in translation – working on the fabulous novel Snowblind from Icelandic crime writer Ragnar Jónasson (published in English by Orenda Books) …

It has been something of a step into the unknown. All right, I’ve done plenty of translation before from my adopted second language, Icelandic, a language that 320,000 Icelanders and a couple of dozen non-Icelanders speak. It’s a long story, but I lived there for a long time, boy meets girl and all that stuff, and found myself staying a lot longer than originally intended.

But to get back on track, I’ve done bits and pieces of translation before, almost all of it fairly grim technical and news material, although there was a novel I translated years ago for the fun of it and eventually wound up publishing myself as an e-book. It’s here if you fancy a look, but I warn you, it’s not a crime story and there are no murders in there.

It was a surprise that there are so few Icelandic crime writers translated into English. For a long time there were only two, the two everyone knows about, Arnaldur Indriðason and Yrsa Sigurðardóttir. Then they were joined by Viktor Arnar Ingólfsson with a handful of books and Árni Thórarinsson with only one and it’s a shame as Árni’s books are excellent, refreshingly different with a journalist as a protagonist rather than a detective or a lawyer. It has long been a mystery to me why so many Swedish and Norwegian crime authors seem to make it seamlessly into English, while their Danish, Finnish and Icelandic counterparts have been left behind, even though they frequently seem to be published in every other language; but not English.

But now there’s one more. A bunch of us conspired to get Ragnar Jónasson published in English, pulling strings and passing the word to kick-start the process.

The excellent Karen Sullivan was in the process of setting up her new imprint, Orenda Books, and was able to publish six books in her first year. She managed to secure Ragnar’s Snowblind, his debut novel (published on 20th April on Kindle and 15th June in paperback) as well as his latest novel, Nightblind.

So this is where the step into the unknown began. I was sure I could produce a translation, and hoped it would be up to Karen’s exacting standards, very much aware that for a new publisher with a limited number books in its first year, each book has to count.

Translation is different from writing your own stuff. There are similar technical aspects, but it calls for a different set of skills. There’s no plotting to worry about as the author has already done all the heavy lifting there, but while technical translation calls for precision and accuracy, literary translation also calls for accuracy, but in a different way.

Snowblind cover image

Snowblind cover image

A technical handbook needs to be as close to the original as possible, while still making sense, as anyone who has bought a Chinese-made DVD player with a badly translated handbook will understand. With a novel it’s more about being faithful to the spirit of the author’s words than to those words themselves.

Sentences might need to be rolled together, as Icelandic uses short, sharp sentences. Like this one. That don’t work in English. Punctuation is also a headache and it has taken me years to figure out that a full stop in Icelandic isn’t necessarily the same as a full stop in English. The nature of an Icelandic full stop can depend on the context and it can be the equivalent of a semi-colon, or even a comma, just a pause in a narrative rather than a break, but the context is all-important.

Then there are the idioms that need to be rendered into English, and often enough there isn’t any direct translation that does the original justice or captures the right feel. So some suitable parallel phrase has to be found. Worst of all are jokes, especially a joke or a phrase that relies on an untranslatable play on words. This is where the translator has to go out on a limb and trust instinct that the replacement joke, which may be nowhere even close to the original wording, is strong enough to capture the elusive feel that the author was looking for.

All this has to be achieved without crossing the often very elastic line from being a translator into the other world of being an editor. There should never be a temptation to improve on an author’s work, only to interpret it in the best way possible, and it’s well known that a poor translation can ruin a good book. On the other hand, an inspired translation can lift a good book and make it into something outstanding.

These days I find myself looking for the translator’s name as well as the author’s. I know that if a book translated from French has Frank Wynne’s or Ros Schwartz’s name on it, I’ll be in good hands. The same goes for Anthea Bell, that queen among translators who produced those inspired English-language versions of Asterix the Gaul that were part of my childhood, plus so much else… then there’s Don Bartlett for anything from Norwegian, and this list goes on.

So it has been a challenge. Translation has also been better that the most fiendish crossword for keeping the grey cells active, almost as fiendish as the plotting of Ragnar’s book. There has been much silent muttering and poring over dictionaries, and my vocabulary of obscure Icelandic words has certainly grown.

Would I do it again? I already am… Look out for Nightblind next year, and hopefully a few more of Iceland’s stable of crime writers appearing in English in the next few years.

A huge thank you to Quentin Bates for dropping by today to talk about stepping into the translation zone, and for giving us a peep behind the scenes at Snowblind.

Summerchill cover image

Summerchill cover image

Snowblind by Ragnar Jónasson is released as an ebook today and in paperback on 15th June. Here’s the blurb: Siglufjörður: an idyllically quiet fishing village in Northern Iceland, where no one locks their doors – accessible only via a small mountain tunnel. Ari Thór Arason: a rookie policeman on his first posting, far from his girlfriend in Reykjavik – with a past that he’s unable to leave behind. When a young woman is found lying half-naked in the snow, bleeding and unconscious, and a highly esteemed, elderly writer falls to his death in the local theatre, Ari is dragged straight into the heart of a community where he can trust no one, and secrets and lies are a way of life. An avalanche and unremitting snowstorms close the mountain pass, and the 24-hour darkness threatens to push Ari over the edge, as curtains begin to twitch, and his investigation becomes increasingly complex, chilling and personal. Past plays tag with the present and the claustrophobic tension mounts, while Ari is thrust ever deeper into his own darkness – blinded by snow, and with a killer on the loose.”

Quentin Bates’ latest book Summerchill (the next in his popular Gunnhildur Gísladóttir series) is out on 7th May and available now for pre-order. Here’s the blurb: It’s the tail end of a hot summer when half of Reykjavík is on holiday and the other half wishes it was. Things are quiet when a man is reported missing from his home in the suburbs. As Gunna and Helgi investigate, it becomes clear that the missing man had secrets of his own that lead to a sinister set of friends, and to someone with little to lose who is a fugitive from both justice and the underworld. It becomes a challenge for Gunna to tail both the victim and his would-be executioner, racing to catch up with at least one of them before they finally meet.”